IAT-334: 03 Thinking Like Them

Thinking Like Them

Lecture outline

In this week's lecture we will begin to discuss users,

Thinking Like Them

Starting to understand users

Close all laptops please! (Back row is excluded)

A UI Sketch for login screens
A UI Sketch for login screens
How does this UI patch the 'big fingers, little UI' problem effectively or not?
A UI Sketch for login screens
As a user looking to sign-up for an account, why might this UI make it more or less efficient?
A UI Sketch for login screens
How does this UI assist or hinder a user's ability to sign up for an account?
A UI Sketch for login screens
What makes this approach more or less efficient?

Users Have Goals

Last week we talked about how users have goals in using your interface. This week we're going to get to know the users more.

Types of Goals

End Goals: What a user is trying to do. Made up of a series of tasks to reach a result.

Experience Goals: The type of experience a user may wish to have while in pursuit of their end goal. Often subjective.

Life Goals: Influence on other goals. Often drives the why a user is using a particular system in the first place. Drives decisions.

Types of Goals

An example

End Goals: I want to find dog to pet.

Experience Goals: I want to find a dog to pet fairly easily, while not seeming like a creeper for wanting to pet someone else's dog.

Life Goals: I'm trying to conquer my fears. I have been afraid of dogs since I was a child, but really don't want to be scared anymore.

Users Have Types

While understanding user goals is important to designing an effective interface, remembering different types of users — from beginner to expert — comes into play when designing an interface.

Users Have Types

Beginners:

  • No wants to be one.
  • Looking for a mental-model match.
  • Not dumb, likely busy.
User Onboarding

Users Have Types

Experts:

  • Frequent users.
  • Tired of repetitive tasks.
  • Want to push system boundaries.
  • More likely to customize.
  • Most likely to provide feedback.

Beginners:

  • No wants to be one.
  • Looking for a mental-model match.
  • Not dumb, likely busy.
An advertisement for Final Cut X stating 'Everything just changed in post'

Users Have Types

Intermediates:

  • Need functional reminders.
  • Make more use of documentation.
  • Will see assistance.
  • May begin to customize worflow/interface.
  • Often the largest group of users.

Experts:

  • Frequent users.
  • Tired of repetitive tasks.
  • Want to push system boundaries.
  • More likely to customize.
  • Most likely to provide feedback.

Beginners:

  • No wants to be one.
  • Looking for a mental-model match.
  • Not dumb, likely busy.

Which users are best supported by each of these?

An update failure notification from Windows 7
An update failure notification from Windows 10
"There is no avoiding the hard work of really understanding the people who will actually interact with your product."
Cooper, Reiman & Cronin (2007)

Users are Human (Too)

Users often do not know what they want, which makes it difficult ot simply ask them what they want you to do. You instead need to figure it out through a combination of interview and observation.

Laseau's Funnel of design
10 Usability Heuristics

Break time!

Please return within the approximate time it takes all thirty clowns to exit the clown-car.

Let's Evaluate a UI

I am going to step through the task of navigating myself to SFU Woodwards from SFU Surrey. We are going to do some evaluation of that process along the way.

Roles

Noters: Will be watching how I step through the interface and make note of what happened. This could include:

  • My reactions
  • Types of tasks being performed
  • Length of time to complete different tasks
  • Hang-ups or points of frustration

Testers: Will pick three Neilsen heuristics and watch for when they are working, or not. Try to quickly sketch out where and when the problems occur.

P02: Feature Design

User Evaluation

Not all of your subjects will have previous experience with the application you are evaluating. Try to locate individuals that have goals or interests that align with what the application is designed to do to provide you with insight.

What was the purpose of an affinity diagram as introduced by this week's reading?

Affinity Diagrams

Ensuring you have a noter and a tester, create an affinity diagram illustrating some of your insights based on your observations.

You have five minutes.

Personas

Personas are meant to be archetypes not stereotypes. As a result, it is important that you work with the material you found in your research to inform your personas.

Elements of a Persona

Personas are meant to help us empathize with your users. As a result, aim to be as clear and realistic in the creation of a persona without writing a life story. Include:

A sample persona
Persona example from nngroup.com

How to Use Goals

To better identify goals, keep your focus on the design-related information, and look for insight such as the following:

Goals and Interactions

Your user’s goals drive their motivations to use your interface. Understanding their goals will help you understand why they are making the choice they are making, as well as their reactions.

Any questions?

UI Sketchbook

Sketch #3

Based on the application assigned to your group as part of P02, select what you would identify as a 'feature' within the assigned application and pull it apart in sketches. Your sketches should identify:

In This Week's Labs...

You will be practicing some short testing of your interfaces and form teams for Project 2.

In Next Week's Lecture...

Scenes and scenarios; a how-to guide.

Contacting Andrew

Options: